NASA Goddard
Your #EarthNow — The deployment of two new instruments on the International Space Station (#ISS) will for the first time convert the orbiting astronaut lab into a platform for continuous observations of Earth. The ISS-RapidScat instrument will observe how winds behave around the globe to benefit weather forecasts and hurricane monitoring, while the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System, or CATS, instrument will make critical measurements of clouds and aerosols – still the two climate change variables most difficult to measure and predict.

To learn more about NASA’s plans to study Earth in 2014, visit: www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

#nasagoddard #earth #science #space #cats

Your #EarthNow — The deployment of two new instruments on the International Space Station (#ISS) will for the first time convert the orbiting astronaut lab into a platform for continuous observations of Earth. The ISS-RapidScat instrument will observe how winds behave around the globe to benefit weather forecasts and hurricane monitoring, while the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System, or CATS, instrument will make critical measurements of clouds and aerosols – still the two climate change variables most difficult to measure and predict.

To learn more about NASA’s plans to study Earth in 2014, visit: www.nasa.gov/earthrightnow

#nasagoddard #earth #science #space #cats

Afternoon sun and shadows on our Hubble Space Telescope and Solar Dynamics Observatory displays. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth (at NASA GSFC Building 3/14)

Afternoon sun and shadows on our Hubble Space Telescope and Solar Dynamics Observatory displays. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth (at NASA GSFC Building 3/14)

Ross Sea —  November 21, 2013 - NASA’s Operation IceBridge P-3 landed a few minutes ago after a successful survey of sea ice in the Ross Sea. In this photo taken by project scientist Michael Studinger we see icebergs in Sulzberger Bay off of the eastern portion of the Ross Sea.

NASA’s Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth’s polar ice. In 2013, IceBridge is conducting its first field campaign directly from Antarctica. 

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Michael Studinger #nasagoddard #weather #ice #snow

Ross Sea — November 21, 2013 - NASA’s Operation IceBridge P-3 landed a few minutes ago after a successful survey of sea ice in the Ross Sea. In this photo taken by project scientist Michael Studinger we see icebergs in Sulzberger Bay off of the eastern portion of the Ross Sea.

NASA’s Operation IceBridge is an airborne science mission to study Earth’s polar ice. In 2013, IceBridge is conducting its first field campaign directly from Antarctica.

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Michael Studinger #nasagoddard #weather #ice #snow

Play Rescue 406! on Flickr.Rescue 406! is a new game from NASA and NOAA. Rescue 406! is a new mobile game that puts you in charge of search and rescue operations. Be a hero as you use information from GOES-R weather satellites to locate and save people in distress. 
Download it today at the Apple iTunes store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/rescue-406/id694112931?mt=8.

Play Rescue 406! on Flickr.

Rescue 406! is a new game from NASA and NOAA. Rescue 406! is a new mobile game that puts you in charge of search and rescue operations. Be a hero as you use information from GOES-R weather satellites to locate and save people in distress.

Download it today at the Apple iTunes store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/rescue-406/id694112931?mt=8.

NASA Hubble Sees Sparring Antennae Galaxies — The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped the best ever image of the Antennae Galaxies. Hubble has released images of these stunning galaxies twice before, once using observations from its Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in 1997, and again in 2006 from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Each of Hubble’s images of the Antennae Galaxies has been better than the last, due to upgrades made during the famous servicing missions, the last of which took place in 2009.

The galaxies — also known as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039 — are locked in a deadly embrace. Once normal, sedate spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, the pair have spent the past few hundred million years sparring with one another. This clash is so violent that stars have been ripped from their host galaxies to form a streaming arc between the two. In wide-field images of the pair the reason for their name becomes clear — far-flung stars and streamers of gas stretch out into space, creating long tidal tails reminiscent of antennae.

This new image of the Antennae Galaxies shows obvious signs of chaos. Clouds of gas are seen in bright pink and red, surrounding the bright flashes of blue star-forming regions — some of which are partially obscured by dark patches of dust. The rate of star formation is so high that the Antennae Galaxies are said to be in a state of starburst, a period in which all of the gas within the galaxies is being used to form stars. This cannot last forever and neither can the separate galaxies; eventually the nuclei will coalesce, and the galaxies will begin their retirement together as one large elliptical galaxy.

Credit: NASA/European Space Agency #nasagoddard #Hubble #HST #Galaxy #space #star

NASA Hubble Sees Sparring Antennae Galaxies — The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped the best ever image of the Antennae Galaxies. Hubble has released images of these stunning galaxies twice before, once using observations from its Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in 1997, and again in 2006 from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Each of Hubble’s images of the Antennae Galaxies has been better than the last, due to upgrades made during the famous servicing missions, the last of which took place in 2009.

The galaxies — also known as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039 — are locked in a deadly embrace. Once normal, sedate spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, the pair have spent the past few hundred million years sparring with one another. This clash is so violent that stars have been ripped from their host galaxies to form a streaming arc between the two. In wide-field images of the pair the reason for their name becomes clear — far-flung stars and streamers of gas stretch out into space, creating long tidal tails reminiscent of antennae.

This new image of the Antennae Galaxies shows obvious signs of chaos. Clouds of gas are seen in bright pink and red, surrounding the bright flashes of blue star-forming regions — some of which are partially obscured by dark patches of dust. The rate of star formation is so high that the Antennae Galaxies are said to be in a state of starburst, a period in which all of the gas within the galaxies is being used to form stars. This cannot last forever and neither can the separate galaxies; eventually the nuclei will coalesce, and the galaxies will begin their retirement together as one large elliptical galaxy.

Credit: NASA/European Space Agency #nasagoddard #Hubble #HST #Galaxy #space #star

NASA Webb Mirror is ‘CIAF’ and Sound on Flickr.The Boomerang nebula, called the “coldest place in the universe,” reveals its true shape to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope. The background blue structure, as seen in visible light by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, shows a classic double-lobe shape with a very narrow central region. ALMA’s resolution and ability to see the cold gas molecules reveals the nebula’s more elongated shape, as seen in red. 
Image credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF/NASA/STScI/JPL-Caltech

NASA Webb Mirror is ‘CIAF’ and Sound on Flickr.

The Boomerang nebula, called the “coldest place in the universe,” reveals its true shape to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope. The background blue structure, as seen in visible light by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, shows a classic double-lobe shape with a very narrow central region. ALMA’s resolution and ability to see the cold gas molecules reveals the nebula’s more elongated shape, as seen in red.

Image credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF/NASA/STScI/JPL-Caltech

Five Days of Flares and CMEs on the Sun

This movie shows 23 of the 26 M- and X-class flares on the sun between 18:00 UT Oct. 23 and 15:00 UT Oct. 28, 2013, as captured by NASA’s SOHO LASCO C2 coronagraph. It also shows the coronal mass ejections — great clouds of solar material bursting off the sun into space. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center #nasagoddard #sun #cme #space

A Satellite View of One Side of the World Today

A Quiet Atlantic and an Eastern Pacific Hurricane — This full-disk visible satellite image of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite was captured today Oct. 28 at 1:45 p.m. EDT. 
In the northern hemisphere, clouds associated with a frontal system lay draped over the eastern Atlantic, stretching up into the North Atlantic. In the northwestern U.S. another area of low pressure has moved onshore and was centered over Washington State bringing clouds and showers to the region. A cold front that dropped south from Canada is draped from Montana east through North Dakota and northern Minnesota, bringing clouds in that region. Further south, in eastern Texas there is a low pressure area generating clouds while high pressure brings clear skies and sunshine to Florida. 
In the southern hemisphere, much of South America appears quiet with fair weather clouds, and some convective thunderstorms in countries like Colombia 
Tropically-speaking it’s quiet today in the Atlantic Ocean basin. There’s one tropical wave that extends from 16 north to 58 west to 7 north and 53 west. It is moving west at 15 knots and is embedded within a high, moist, environment. There are a few other notable features but no other tropical waves. 
It’s a different story in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, however, because Hurricane Raymond is spinning over 650 miles away from Mexico’s Baja California. At 11 a.m. EDT Hurricane Raymond’s maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph/140 kph and weakening. The center of Hurricane Raymond was about 645 miles/1,035 km southwest of the southern tip of Mexico’s Baja California.  Raymond is moving into an area with stronger wind shear, cooler sea surface temperatures and drier air: three factors that will lead to its dissipation in the next couple of days. 
In the southern Atlantic Ocean spins an area of low pressure east of Chile, while west of Chile in the southeastern Pacific spins another low over open waters. 
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

#nasagoddard #weather #earth

A Satellite View of One Side of the World Today

A Quiet Atlantic and an Eastern Pacific Hurricane — This full-disk visible satellite image of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean from NOAA’s GOES-East satellite was captured today Oct. 28 at 1:45 p.m. EDT.
In the northern hemisphere, clouds associated with a frontal system lay draped over the eastern Atlantic, stretching up into the North Atlantic. In the northwestern U.S. another area of low pressure has moved onshore and was centered over Washington State bringing clouds and showers to the region. A cold front that dropped south from Canada is draped from Montana east through North Dakota and northern Minnesota, bringing clouds in that region. Further south, in eastern Texas there is a low pressure area generating clouds while high pressure brings clear skies and sunshine to Florida.
In the southern hemisphere, much of South America appears quiet with fair weather clouds, and some convective thunderstorms in countries like Colombia
Tropically-speaking it’s quiet today in the Atlantic Ocean basin. There’s one tropical wave that extends from 16 north to 58 west to 7 north and 53 west. It is moving west at 15 knots and is embedded within a high, moist, environment. There are a few other notable features but no other tropical waves.
It’s a different story in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, however, because Hurricane Raymond is spinning over 650 miles away from Mexico’s Baja California. At 11 a.m. EDT Hurricane Raymond’s maximum sustained winds were near 85 mph/140 kph and weakening. The center of Hurricane Raymond was about 645 miles/1,035 km southwest of the southern tip of Mexico’s Baja California. Raymond is moving into an area with stronger wind shear, cooler sea surface temperatures and drier air: three factors that will lead to its dissipation in the next couple of days.
In the southern Atlantic Ocean spins an area of low pressure east of Chile, while west of Chile in the southeastern Pacific spins another low over open waters.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

#nasagoddard #weather #earth

3D Moon!

This is an anaglyph of an Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC)  Wide Angle Camera (WAC) mosaic of the lunar nearside taken at low-Sun conditions. You will need 3D stereo glasses to see it pop off your screen! 

The two perspectives that make up this anaglyph were generated by draping the same low-Sun WAC mosaic of the lunar nearside over the Global Lunar DTM (Digital Terrain Model) 100 m topographic model (GLD100) with two different sub-Earth points.

Planetary scientists use anaglyphs to visualize the 3D structure of planetary surfaces. For example, NASA’s HiRISE team has over three thousand anaglyphs of the Martian terrain available for scientific study and public use. This type of visualization is helpful with the intuitive and qualitative interpretation of a scene by revealing geologic relationships that are not obvious from a single 2D image. 

Read more and view more 3D images here: http://bit.ly/HgLdfk

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University #nasagoddard #3D #moon #LRO

3D Moon!

This is an anaglyph of an Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) mosaic of the lunar nearside taken at low-Sun conditions. You will need 3D stereo glasses to see it pop off your screen!

The two perspectives that make up this anaglyph were generated by draping the same low-Sun WAC mosaic of the lunar nearside over the Global Lunar DTM (Digital Terrain Model) 100 m topographic model (GLD100) with two different sub-Earth points.

Planetary scientists use anaglyphs to visualize the 3D structure of planetary surfaces. For example, NASA’s HiRISE team has over three thousand anaglyphs of the Martian terrain available for scientific study and public use. This type of visualization is helpful with the intuitive and qualitative interpretation of a scene by revealing geologic relationships that are not obvious from a single 2D image.

Read more and view more 3D images here: http://bit.ly/HgLdfk

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University #nasagoddard #3D #moon #LRO

Hubble Tracks a Monster in the Milky Way

This image shows the star-studded center of the Milky Way towards the constellation of #Sagittarius. The crowded center of our galaxy contains numerous complex and mysterious objects that are usually hidden at optical wavelengths by clouds of dust — but many are visible here in these infrared observations from Hubble.

However, the most famous cosmic object in this image still remains invisible: the monster at our galaxy’s heart called Sagittarius A*. #Astronomers have observed stars spinning around this supermassive black hole (located right in the center of the image), and the black hole consuming clouds of dust as it affects its environment with its enormous gravitational pull.

Infrared observations can pierce through thick obscuring material to reveal information that is usually hidden to the optical observer. This is the best infrared image of this region ever taken with Hubble, and uses infrared archive data from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, taken in September 2011.  Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Brammer  #nasagoddard #hubble #MilkyWay #space #star #galaxy

Hubble Tracks a Monster in the Milky Way

This image shows the star-studded center of the Milky Way towards the constellation of #Sagittarius. The crowded center of our galaxy contains numerous complex and mysterious objects that are usually hidden at optical wavelengths by clouds of dust — but many are visible here in these infrared observations from Hubble.

However, the most famous cosmic object in this image still remains invisible: the monster at our galaxy’s heart called Sagittarius A*. #Astronomers have observed stars spinning around this supermassive black hole (located right in the center of the image), and the black hole consuming clouds of dust as it affects its environment with its enormous gravitational pull.

Infrared observations can pierce through thick obscuring material to reveal information that is usually hidden to the optical observer. This is the best infrared image of this region ever taken with Hubble, and uses infrared archive data from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, taken in September 2011. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Brammer #nasagoddard #hubble #MilkyWay #space #star #galaxy